Feature: The wonderful world of festival volunteering

In these times of financial uncertainty, it is becoming more and more difficult for avid music fans to experience live performances; entrance fees for gigs are increasing at an exorbitant rate, whilst a weekend ticket for a music festival often cost hundreds of pounds. It’s not surprising, therefore, that many festival visitors are opting to…

Review: She Drew The Gun – Memories of the Future

Falling somewhere between PJ Harvey and Beach House, She Drew The Gun have produced a luscious yet powerful debut album. There’s a buzz around this Liverpool artist – they’re the winners of the Glastonbury ‘Emerging Talent’ competition and have been added to the Radio 6 ‘Playlist of the Week’ – and Memories of the Future…

Review: White Wine – Who Cares What the Laser Says?

White Wine make art-rock that is on one hand terrified of the modern world, and on the other launches itself into the future head first. Frontman Joe Haege describes the modern world as a place of “less empathy, more distraction, no focus, the digital preaching to the choir of social media and the endless ways…

Review: Swahili Blonde – And Only the Melody Was Real

Swahili Blonde’s album, And Only the Melody Was Real, is held together through a unifying tone; a feeling; a sense of mystery. The overall effect of the music is strangely serene and sometimes sombre, unusual from an artist whose sound is best described as Kraftwerk-esque electro with a dash of afro-beat. This feeling of mystery is…

Feature: Top 12 Albums To Look Forward To In 2016

With the start of the new year just around the corner, we take a look at some of the most exciting albums set for release in 2016 so far. Hinds – Leave Me Alone After forming in Madrid in 2011, Hinds have been having far too much fun playing international festivals and making friends with the likes…

Girls: ‘The Best Band That No-one’s Ever Heard Of’

Girls are the best band that no-one’s ever heard of. Their music sounds like the messy results of Buddy Holly, a gospel choir and Ariel Pink being thrown into a blender. It’s filled with a haphazard collection of clichés and references, plucked randomly from every corner of American pop culture. Combining this with stinging emotional clarity to…