Review: Cinders Ensemble – Lonely Eskimo

Texas chamber ensemble Cinders have returned after more than a decade of no recording with Lonely Eskimo, a traditional chamber music approach which incorporates some interesting post-rock stylings. The record is comprised mainly of sombre, orthodox tunes which are incredibly polished. Despite being their first release in 15 years, the album irritatingly errs on the…

Review: TaxiWars – Fever

TaxiWars are a Belgian four piece led by Tom Barman, veteran of the avant garde music and film scene. Using this experimental approach, the band create a sort of chamber music blending free jazz with more rock oriented rhythms. Barman himself is undoubtedly inspired by Mark Sandman of Morphine, with the vocal delivery being almost…

Review: Touche Amore – Stage Four

  Californian five piece Touché Amoré return with a fourth offering, aptly named Stage Four. Having established themselves as one of the most prominent post-hardcore bands of the past decade, the group have been consistently experimenting with lengthier songs with a more progressive approach than the typical 2 minutes-and-out approach that has been pervasive within…

Review: Happy Diving – Electric Soul Unity

“Revivals” are far too common in music today. The currently in vogue, lo-fi indie aesthetic is often a way to hide behind uninspiring song writing, stale ideas and lazy production. However, every so often a band arrives on the music scene that, regardless of how derivative and trite their ideas are, their charm can eclipse…

Celebrating the unique life and career of Alan Vega (1938-2016)

On July 16th , Suicide frontman Alan Vega sadly passed away. He leaves behind one of the most influential musical legacies of any 20th century artist. Formed in 1970 with instrumentalist Martin Rev, Suicide quickly began creating their claustrophobic vignettes of American life with four tight walls of cheap drum machines, tinny synths, short loops…

Review: Narcs-A Thinking Animal

Politically conscious Leeds group Narcs provide an energetic take on the English indie scene with their debut album A Thinking Animal. Sporting a thick West Yorkshire accent, frontman Wilko delivers an aggressive performance throughout, backed by a near-constant cacophony of distorted instruments and thumping drums. The album opens with a rare moment of calm as…

Review: Night School-Blush

Headed by ex-Whirr singer, Lexy Morte, Night School offer a more upbeat take on the shoegaze sound of her previous band with their debut album, Blush. Clearly inspired by contemporary California dream-pop bands like Wavves and Best Coast, the group offer a wide variety of fuzz-soaked songs obviously aimed at a summer audience. The barely…

Review: The Golden Grass – Coming Back Again

70s rock revival trio The Golden Grass return with their sophomore album Coming Back Again; a 6 track offering with very little to actually offer. The album kicks off with the lead single ‘Get It Together’, which, despite the band’s psychedelic image and branding, is essentially a poorer version of a Grand Funk Railroad or Allman Brothers…

Feature: Top Debut Albums of All Time

No matter how successful an artist or band may later become, their first offering is in many ways the most defining. Here, We Are Unseen pick their all time favourite debuts, and explain what makes them stand out from the crowd. White Lies: To Lose My Life Besides its sombrely uplifting core, what makes To…

Review: Slingshot Dakota – Break

Slingshot Dakota, an electronic duo from Pennsylvania, return with their fourth album, Break. Things get off to a promising start with the first track ‘You’ – a high energy affair showcasing their unique brand of twee-electronica, resembling Dolly Mixture if they swapped the guitar and bass for synths and fuzz pedals. This sets the tone for the…

Review: Electric Eye – Bless

With their seemingly ambitious second album, Bless, Norwegian psych outfit Electric Eye manage to create an impeccably produced callback to the space rock and koscmische musik of the seventies. The album begins with the chaotic ‘Silent by the River’, an upbeat affair complete with the hallmark guitar noodling drenched in echo, and animalistic drumming typical of cosmic rock bands…

Review: Gavin Clarke and Toydrum – Evangelist

Evangelist is the combined efforts of late singer-songwriter Gavin Clarke and Toydrum – James Griffiths and Pablo Clements of UNKLE fame. The album serves as an autobiographical swan song for Clarke, using the loose concept of the rise and fall of a preacher as a metaphor to portray the battle against his own demons, complete with euphoric highs…