Review from the Archive: Papa Roach – The Connection

Whilst Papa Roach haven’t exactly gone anywhere over the last few years, they’ve certainly been off the radar. However, we can thank their need to re-establish that bond with their faithful fans, as well as their effort to assert themselves in a fresh light, with bringing us The Connection, a thoughtful offering from the California…

Review from the Archive: The Gaslight Anthem – Handwritten

The Gaslight Anthem certainly has a lot to live up to. The undeniable success of their 2010 release American Slang, as well as Brian Fallon’s solo effort Elsie with Ian Perkins has raised the bar to unbelievable heights. But rest assured, the New Jersey foursome have succeeded, over and over again with their new album…

Review from the Archive: KaiL Baxley – Heatstroke/ The Wind and the War

Difficult to initially categorise, KaiL Baxley’s double EP can only be described as a range of charming, laid-back and fresh acoustic tunes. His unique voice sends a haunting chill that spreads throughout the tracks to become strangely anthemic. The opening song, ‘Don’t Matter to Me’, is a rhythmic, bluesy introduction that sets the bar for…

Robert Wyatt: From Soft Machine to Solo Artist

One of the most idiosyncratic figures of the late 60s British music scene was the multi-instrumentalist jazz fusion anomaly Robert Wyatt. Originally starting out with the now-borderline mythical group the Wilde Flowers, Wyatt and Kevin Ayers formed Soft Machine, arguably the most important band of the Canterbury scene. Their debut album contained little Wyatt-penned material, instead focusing on the…

Deap Vally: Feminism in Music

Back in 2011, Lindsey Troy wandered into The Little Knittery, a knitting shop owned by Julie Edwards, wearing a stained shirt and no bra. Edwards thought she was ‘pretty badass’. Little did the LA duo know a year later they would become Deap Vally – punk-rock’s very own head-banging, hair-flipping feminist icons, and an inspiration to angry teens…

Review From the Archive: John Wheeler – Un-American Gothic

This album is the first full-length solo effort from Hayseed Dixie frontman John Wheeler – and it certainly manages to keep up with the legacy of offbeat, folky tunes. Written whilst on tour with the band in 2011, Wheeler travelled to every show in solitude on his motorbike, making for a soulful and varied album….

Girls: ‘The Best Band That No-one’s Ever Heard Of’

Girls are the best band that no-one’s ever heard of. Their music sounds like the messy results of Buddy Holly, a gospel choir and Ariel Pink being thrown into a blender. It’s filled with a haphazard collection of clichés and references, plucked randomly from every corner of American pop culture. Combining this with stinging emotional clarity to…

Songs of Sisterhood: How the Spice Girls Changed the World

Known as the most successful female band in history, the Spice Girls have achieved so much more than international acclaim. During their six year life span, which took place between 1994 and 2000, this group of five seemingly ordinary young women influenced British pop culture in an extraordinary way. Armed with unassailable talent and an inexorable passion to create…

The Lyrical Power of Imagine Dragons

Four Las Vegas guys with one passion created a band which, unbeknownst to them, would become the “Breakthrough Band of 2013”. With the combined talent to match some of the most prestigious musical geniuses in the world; Dan, Wayne, Ben and Daniel stormed the global music industry with their alternative rock band: Imagine Dragons. Like every other successful…

Hozier: The Return of Political Music

Adopting the stage name of Hozier, Irish musician Andrew Hozier-Byrne’s raw vocals and impressive multi- instrumental musicianship, rooting himself within the soul, blues and pop genres, came solidly into lime-light when his song ‘Take me to Church’ topped the charts in 2014. However, beyond the powerful soul genre, catchy chorus and rustic vocals, the song empowers a prominent message…